How to Create Advertising That Sells: Review of the Legendary Advertising Showpiece

How to Create Advertising that Sells Review

David Ogilvy is known across the world as “The Father of Advertising.” This How to Create Advertising That Sells Review looks at one of the strongest, if not THE strongest, works on the rules of advertising. It’s based solely on market research and will deliver on the promise.

Ogilvy was an advertising exec sensation who was sought after within his industry. He compiled more than 40 years of advertising research into one amazing piece. It only contains 1900 words. It ran during the 1960’s and 1970’s in newspapers for his company. Ogilvy wrote Confessions of an Advertising Man, quite probably the most prominent and celebrated books authored on Advertising. He started his lengthy vocation employed by Gallup. Knowing what Gallup does, that’s likely to be most perfect point for an advertising man to start a stunning profession.

So We Begin… Part One

In this Ogilvy quintessential masterpiece “How to Create Advertising that Sells” Review, we’ll cover the initial 7 maxims. Now, covering seven rules out of 38 can appear to be insignificant at first glance. However, one would at their wit’s end to stuff this quantity of information concerning the ad biz into a more condensed study.

Maxim One: Position

Ogilvy considers Dove soap as the ideal illustration. They have a few choices for the campaign. Would selling clean hands be their best option? OR, would selling soft skin be a better option? The decision ad execs made that day was the first-rate answer for Unilever as proprietor of the Dove brand. When getting ready to sell a product or service, begin here.

Maxim Two: The Promise

With making a very large promise, Ogilvy said the ad can’t be wrong. Make the “obligation” exclusive. Make it a real contender. Lastly, the product or service had MUST ACCOMPLISH the promise given. If it can’t, start over.

Maxim Three: Image

When considering branding a person or business, create the “most sharply defined personality” for the brand. When every ad campaign goes in several different directions and lacks a concise focus, that business is likely to fail. A big picture is what is missing. Advertising should be based on a campaign, not a single ad. Lacking a consistent theme from one ad to the next is a kiss of death. With social media, coming across as a slightly bi-polar is easily possible. Successful social media campaign ideas have to pull together this idea as a foundation. Make the brand image consistent every place, every time.

Maxim Four: ONE LARGE Idea

Ogilvy said it’s normally a very basic concept. It just takes one idea, though. It required because it “gives the customer a jolt” and makes them pay attention to the ad. It’s no secret that a business must stand apart from the competition in order to get noticed. Agreed? But, in order for a customer to take action, it’s a completely different thing. Developing over-the-top, complicated ideas are amazingly easier than coming up with ONE Straightforward, uncomplicated LARGE idea, according to Ogilvy. It requires pure genius. They will withstand the test of time.

Maxim Five: Superior

Its common sense, but it’s often overlooked. Consumers consider an unattractive product with an “inferior image.” The world in which we live is extremely visual. The way things appear always alters perception, without exception. It’s always been this way. Garbage in… Garbage out.

Maxim Six: Don’t Be Boring

Be very charming. Attempt to engage the viewer and get him or her involved. “Make him hungry.” Next, get him to participate. It isn’t difficult to be interesting, but pushing for involvement is slightly harder.

Maxim Seven: Innovate

Be the starter of trends. Don’t blindly follow crazes and trends. Ogilvy discovered that ad campaigns that followed trends were RARELY successful. He recommended engaging in some market testing with real consumers. It IS a bit precarious to head off into an uncharted direction. Market testing allows ad developers to exercise caution and gain a level of security.

Maxim Eight: Glory Hogs

I bet this was extremely controversial for the time. In fact, it’s probably still controversial because of society. It’s expected that we give a list of our accomplishments and qualifications. Any awards are expected in this list. Ogilvy felt creative awards for ads deludes creativity in people and steers them away from goals. What is the goal? In successful campaigns, the goal is the quest of sales. Ponder upon on what persuades the consumer and not what gains awards.

Review in Summary

So, this was the first quarter of David Ogilvy’s How to Create Advertising that Sells Review. Pretty amazing? Considering how old it is, it is still so relevant and very timely. The value of this document is priceless. Hundreds of thousands had to be spent on worthless, unsuccessful ads in order to gather data and determine what creates success. So, figure out what will be sold and remember to sell the sizzle. Make a large promise, and then deliver. Create a laser-focused brand and place it at the front of each ad. Create ONE LARGE idea. Continue the thread through every campaign. Favorable visuals correspond with more successful campaigns. Boring is bad. Take out some insurance and start a trend. Think profit not recognition.

Part two of How to Create Advertising that Sells Review promises more value along with breathtaking, profit-generating maxims by the advertising legend.

How And Where To Get Your Novel Reviewed

Sold your novel? Congratulations! Now it’s time to start promoting it.

One of the best ways to do this is by getting it reviewed in as many places as possible.
If you’ve sold to a print house, you probably have six to fifteen months to get ready for a big push to coincide with the book launch. Even though the publisher will promote the book, you have to do your part to boost sales.

Success doesn’t just happen. You need to get the word out about your book so people are eager to buy it as soon as it’s available. It takes time and effort to research and line up reviewers, and starting early will produce the best results.

Your publisher will send advanced reading copies to major reviewers, such as “Publishers Weekly”, “NY Times Book Review” and “Library Journal”, but also ask you for a list of possible review places they can contact. These include newspapers of towns and cities where you are known, fraternal or corporate magazines and any radio or television contact that concern books and authors. Requests for reviews from a publisher carry more weight with major reviewers than one from an author, so don’t be shy about passing on local contacts unless you know the reviewer personally or have an influential contact to the source.

On the other hand, if you have a personal connection, such as being a member of a group or an employee of a company producing the magazine, contacting them directly will get the review more easily.

Where to find reviewers

Your main source for promoting through reviews is the Internet.
Few print publishers take the time to research reviewers on the web, yet there are hundreds of them that review print and electronic books. Some specialize in a particular genre, others accept a broader range of stories. Some are theme oriented, others appeal to members of particular groups or occupations.

Also think beyond traditional reviewers. Magazines and ezines or websites for people in the same line of work as your protagonist may publish a review of special interest to their readers.

How to ask for the review

When working on the Web, the first step is to write a blurb about your novel to include in your query letter or with a submission. This blurb is similar to the copy you read on a book jacket. Its purpose is to convince the reviewer to read and review your book. The blurb must make the story sound interesting and exciting so the reviewer wants to read it.

Reviewers don’t review everything sent to them, so it’s up to you to make your novel sound worth their time. Write and polish your blurb so it hooks the reviewer.

The second step is if you are working from a list, visit the site to make sure it is valid. The Web can change in the blink of a mouse’s eye. While there, also check their guidelines for querying or submitting a book for review and follow those guidelines. Use the submission form if there is one. Include whatever is requested with the query, such as publisher’s name, price of book, publication date, contact information, etc. and submit the book in the specified manner and format. In most cases, your submission will be ignored if you don’t follow the guidelines.

And last but not least, be patient. Reviewers receive hundreds of requests. They take time to read books carefully and write thoughtful reviews. Most reviewers don’t reply if they don’t plan to review a book. If they accept yours, it may take several months to receive the review. This emphasizes the need to plan your reviews project early so reviews will come out close to launch date.

Once you have written your blurb and query, keep records of where, when and to whom you send queries or submissions. Also track the responses you receive. If you are not getting at least 20-25% positive responses, take a good hard look at your letter and blurb. Ask a few trusted friends to read them and give honest opinions. Rewrite to improve them! These are selling tools designed to sell reviewers on the idea of accepting your book to review. If the query and blurb aren’t doing the job, redo them until they get the results you need.

A good plan for sending out requests is to begin querying three to four months before launch date of the book. Send out two or three a week, depending on the size of the list of reviewers you compile. This not only makes the job easier, it helps assure a steady supply of new reviews.

Add a review page to your website and add reviews as they come in. I also recommend taking time to send a brief “thank-you” note to each reviewer for the review. You’ll be writing another novel and this courtesy will help you be remembered.

Other sources

Writers know other writers. Chances are you know one who would be happy to do a review of your novel. Independent reviews can be posted on your site or submitted to sites that accept them. Quite a few do. Make a list of them as you research sites on the web.

One of my diligent writer friends compiled a list of more than 200 sites and magazines (print and electronic) that review books. She averaged better than a 30% response rate to her query letters using it. In the true spirit of writers helping writers, she has given me permission to share the list with you. Use the link in my signature box below to request a free copy.

Whether this is your first or fifth published novel, you can’t have too many reviews. Start building your plan to get them today.

Writing Book Reviews to Make Money

For budding writers looking to earn money on the internet, one way to break into the market is by writing book reviews and selling them to websites that need them. If you read on a regular basis, you know that what you read almost always leaves you with one impression or another – why not write about your impressions and earn money while you do so.

For some reason, most people who want to write for the internet tend to skip straight to articles and web content. Very few actually take the time to write a good book review. One of the reasons for this is that sites like Helium and Associated Content are well known article content sites that offer sure money for anyone who can write (and attract an audience to read what they write).

Nevertheless, there is something to be said for writing serious book reviews. People read them before they buy new books, and many people regard book reviews as invaluable tools for weeding out poorly written and irrelevant literature of any genre. Selling reviews is a somewhat more time consuming task than selling articles, however.

When it comes to book reviews, there are fewer options than there are for articles, though the articles that do exist can sometimes lead into steady work for a single client. Submitting your review to a magazine or newspaper, for example, can sometimes earn you an occasional guest reviewer stint, or even a full time job as a staff writer. If your skills are of a high enough quality, your writing may even earn you a job writing other content for the publication.

So, if you’re one of those people who regularly burn through the pages of a book like the front cover’s on fire and you’re racing the flames to see how the story ends, try writing and submitting your own review of a book you’ve recently read. You might surprise even yourself.

Do Subjective Reviews of Multi-Level-Marketing Exist?

For newcomers to network marketing or those who are considering switching companies or even joining an additional MLM opportunity, the multilevel selling review is an critical piece of info. The difficulty is to be ready to find a review that’s unprejudiced and objective, although some viewpoints and suggestions might also be helpful. This article references one or two review sites that offer info.

MLM Review Kings run by Brian Garvin and Jeff West offers a great review of many MLM opportunities along with, of course, their top recommendations. You can find the reviews divided up by categories or in alphabetical order on the right-hand side of the default page, as well as a large amount of information that might aid you as a network marketer.

NetworkMarketingReview.net offers a reasonably comprehensive list of MLM corporations that you might want to test out. You can find them all at the left-hand side of the site in alphabetical order along with some other interesting subjects which are pertinent to internet promotion and web marketing in general. Just this one post offers a treasure house of information. Also, its worth noting the overall view of the network marketing industry on this site is kind of negative. OnlineMLM Forum is one such forum as is MLM Forums. There is several web marketing and internet marketing forums which offer some discernment, although it could be rather subjective, into the internet marketing industry.

The network marketing industry always brings up extremely polar views. Some folk are very passionate about it, including top authors like Robert Allen and Robert Kiyosaki. It’s fascinating to notice that the mention of franchises not too long ago would have caused the same kinds of reactions.

Social marketers who are serious about building their firms should be reading and studying about business basics, the most recent sales and marketing methodologies, tactics for networking and business development, for example.

And a multi-level selling review is a handy place to start if you need to find out more about the industry generally as well as be informed about explicit companies.

How to Publish Your Book: Getting Those All-Important Reviews and Testimonials

Great reviews and testimonials help sell your book; therefore any actions you take to promote your book should include such reviews and testimonials. They can be gold. They help persuade book lovers that your book deserves a place on their shelves. They also help convince bookstore chains, individual bookstores, and libraries to stock your book.

Where do you start? The answer is as early as possible. Most reviewers want an actual copy of the book. An e-book won’t work, although that perception is changing. If reviewers can get an advance copy prior to publication, so much the better. Some reviewers will accept galleys but they expect to receive copies of the finished book later. For example, the School Library Journal will accept galleys. These must be received at least two months prior to the publication date. This gives the Journal time to review your book and print the review in their newsletter, either close to or shortly after publication date. You should be aware, however, that some reviewers do not accept self-published books.

There are several ways to let potential reviewers know about your upcoming book. The obvious one is a press release. As well, social media is playing an increasingly large role. If you have a blog, you can discuss your work and its availability. Better still, you can contact those bloggers with an interest in your book’s topic. They may be willing to write a review and post it on their blog. You could also have a fan page on Facebook. You would encourage your followers to write their own reviews to post on your fan page, and on their own pages.

You are also going to request reviews from newspapers and magazines, especially magazines that have a particular interest in your topic area. The odds of your getting a review in a national newspaper or magazine are pretty small. Getting a review from a local newspaper or magazine, as I’ve done, is more likely. Find out the name of the person to whom your request should go. If you have friends with contacts in the media, especially radio, TV and newspapers, ask them to help you.

Testimonials come from people who have read your book and found it to be of value. It could be a business book with advice on accounting, something technical, such as how to use digital cameras, or simply a piece of fiction that gave special insight to an issue or situation. Sometimes a delighted reader will send you a spontaneous response. More likely you’ll have to contact those with your book and ask for a testimonial. That happened with one of my business books. I first called them, then followed up with e-mail. Out of about 20 requests, five actually responded. This brings me to my final point.

People, though usually well meaning, can be notoriously slow in delivering a review or testimonial, even when they have agreed to do so. You have to be persistent. It may take several calls, multiple e-mails before you get a result. Or you may not hear at all. The problem is that the testimonial is never urgent to those you approach, only to you. And don’t offer an incentive to complete that testimonial. It can bring up issues of integrity. So be persistent. If one source won’t cooperate, keep going to others until you get what you need. Great reviews and testimonials add credibility to your sales efforts. You need them. They help sell books.

Increased Options to Sell Gold May Decrease Consumer Confidence

Since the economic downturn starting back in 2007, the price of gold has steadily increased coinciding with catastrophic collapse of several markets: bank, housing, mortgage, and government. The increase in gold price has translated in to the increase of gold buying and selling from public, private, and government sectors, yet this increase in buyers has created a great confusion for sellers amongst all the choices, how to choose the best buyer that will create the greatest benefit. It is a healthy decision to sell gold and can come in hand a time of great need, the following will attempt to provide you with a basis for finding a reputable gold buyer and increase your confidence to sell gold.

Since the creation and popularity of the internet has eliminated barriers to entry for businesses and sole proprietors, there has been an increased level of competition. This allows for business to greatly compete on basis of price, quality of goods, and customer service. There are also many options to gather customer feedback or referrals. In order to sell gold, as a seller it is important to evaluate a gold buyer on the basis of each of these aspects. A buyer that does not provide some type of information on their prices, estimated transaction time, shipping carrier speeds and insurance, communication before the customer decides to sell, reviews, and overall level of transparency.

Out of the several options to sell gold whether online through the mail or locally in person, there are certainly trustworthy positive experiences to be had. The requirements necessary to create this experience are common sense and a basis for any successful transaction. Additional attention and care is needed with precious metals transactions since this industry is heavily enforced and small volume can translate to very high prices.

By taking the time to investigate the information provided by such businesses you will prevent yourself from being taken advantage of or not receiving a fair percentage of cash for gold.

Easily Get Restaurant Reviews From Customers

These days, people don’t buy anything without reading reviews first. Amazon.com is the world’s favorite shopping mall. Visitors look for an item that is both heavily reviewed and has a mostly positive rating. There is suspicion of items that have no reviews, as that means to most folks that the business is probably new and the item they’re looking at is of questionable quality. Positive customer reviews weigh in big time within the consumer psyche and the convenience at which reviews can be posted means that every interaction with a customer is a potential opportunity to make or break many future sales. These ideas began with the retail industry, and they’ve spread like wildfire to restaurants.

So, should you ask for reviews or not? Let’s review the pros and cons:

PROS

Incentivizing is a great motivator for everything in the world. If you want reviews from your customers, offer them something of value. Asking for reviews isn’t bad as long as you’re not flat-out paying for them. Put something fun together: drop review submitters’ names into a monthly raffle for a free lunch, pick a top reviewer and send them to an exotic themed vacation (think Olive Garden sending families to Italy), have your top chef prepare dinner for a certain special patron. There are tons of ideas that involve a thematic approach to incentivized rewards versus just handing out cash. Get your patrons involved and excited and reap the benefits of a truly passionate reviewer!

If you choose to nudge patrons in the right direction, make it easy for them. Offering them a comment card is one way to go, and you can put that review up on your website, but how can you get the word out on UrbanSpoon or Yelp, two of the most popular restaurant review sites? You’ve got to tell customers where to submit their feedback. “Search for us on UrbanSpoon!” is a quick, easy and non-pushy way to let people know you’re active on that site. Make sure to develop a way to track your review-submitting patrons so that you can reward them. You’ll generally receive an email notification when a review is submitted to either one of those sites.

Posting restaurant reviews can be fun! Think about the power of mobile Smartphone applications: a patron can take a picture of your menu (or their meal plate) on their phone and post it online instantly, even while they’re still eating their Southwest Quesadilla Special. They can then immediately “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” your business based on their experience. This is incredibly helpful to other customers. PRO TIP: Consider taking clear pictures of your menu and your location and uploading them to review sites before someone else does. Doing so helps potential new customers decide if they want to eat at your establishment by taking the guesswork out of what you’ve got to offer. The more information that’s readily available about your business, the better.

CONS

The first question you need to ask yourself honestly is this: “Is my restaurant ready to be reviewed?” Many restaurant owners get antsy and jump the gun, so to speak, in taking steps to force reviews. They may have had a slow grand opening and think that getting “good press” on sites like UrbanSpoon and Yelp is the only way to stay operative. These sites are dynamite for influencing potential customers, but hard selling reviews is not the way to go. If your restaurant isn’t 100% where you want it to be at, incentivizing reviews could also mean reminding people that they can post negative reviews, too. As many small business owners have learned, one negative review that’s boosted to the front page of Google can spell doom for their business. Just like a positive review can encourage new folks to try an unfamiliar restaurant, a negative review can drive just as many away. Lesson: don’t force reviews if you’re not ready for them.

Positive reviews from non-incentivized customers will almost always feel more “real.” So although it may take longer to get a review, it may be worth your wait.

Have you ever read a restaurant review and just known that it was the owner writing it, or one of the company’s employees? How did that make you feel? Most consumers who feel like they’ve experienced a fake review will immediately go elsewhere, with a permanent sense of distrust in that business.

Some review databases (like Yelp) frown on incentivized/paid reviews. They’ll go as far to delete over-zealous, fake sounding reviews in order to keep their site “honest.” In this case, it may not be worth the investment to reward a reviewer.

If your restaurant is outstanding on both service and menu fronts, you may not have to encourage review submittal at all. A new patron should be so floored after having left your establishment that they want to share their experience with the world. Have you ever been to a restaurant where the server was “on it,” the food was excellent, the wait was nonexistent, and the atmosphere was just fun? I bet you wanted to tell people about it. This same theory applies to restaurant reviews: provide an entirely excellent experience at every point of contact and expect to be rewarded for your hard work.

The answer is up to you. If you can solicit reviews in a fun, creative way, that plan might work out well for your business. Beware of over-incentivizing; remember you want honest reviews, not a bunch of fluff. No doubt, reviews are a superb way to generate new business. You might even say they’ve become essential in today’s world of infinite information. Keep in mind that consistently great service will be rewarded with words of praise, so keep your bar set high, your plates clean, drinks full, food hot, and staff friendly. You’ll eventually get to the point where you don’t need to solicit reviews anymore, they’ll just come naturally.

Blog For Money – You Must Have Something To Sell

Blogging has become a successful home business for many people. It’s an easy business to start, because there are few or no start up costs. However, if you want to make money, you must have something to sell on your blog – create a “sales” blog.

Although content-heavy blogs on which you sell advertising do make money, these blogs take time before they become profitable, simply because you need a lot of content. How much content? Since blogging has become mainstream, and there are many content blogs, it may take at least 500 to 1000 posts on a content blog for profitability.

“Sales” blogs, which sell products or services, can be profitable with as few as ten to 20 blog posts.

So aim for a sales blog, so your blog becomes profitable more quickly.

Before you start blogging, you need a plan. Create your plan first, before you create your blog. It’s difficult to make money with a blog which hasn’t been set up as a money-maker from the start.

Let’s look at four easy steps to developing a profitable sales blog.

1. Decide what you’ll sell on your blog

To make money, your blog must sell something: a service, or a product. Many bloggers sell affiliate products from their blog.

If you’ve been blogging for a while, you can sell your blogging services from your blog.

2. Make a list of the products, or services which you’ll sell

If you’re selling as an affiliate, make a list of products you’ll sell – reviews of these products will form the basis of your blog articles.

Many affiliate bloggers sell lots of products on a single blog. However, it will be more profitable to divide the products you’re selling into topics; then create a new blog for each topic. This means that each blog can be more focused, and this will mean more traffic.

If you’re selling your own blogging services, set up the blog to do this. Write articles promoting each service you provide. Essentially, the blog becomes your online portfolio.

3. Start blogging, but keep SALES at the forefront of your mind

Next, you can start writing blog posts. However, plan your posts. Planning is vital for a sales blog. For example, let’s say you’ve created a sales blog to sell affiliate products related to pets.

You’ve collected ten affiliate products. Plan articles related to those ten products. You can create review-style articles, as well as general content articles with a link to one of your affiliate products.

If you want to get hired as a blogger, then this must be obvious on your blog, and on every post you write – write several articles promoting each of your services.

4. Promote your blog

Finally, it’s time to promote your blog. There are many ways in which you can promote your blog: with classified advertising, Pay Per Click advertising, and article marketing.

How you choose to promote is up to you. However, do remember that you must promote your blog.

So there you have four easy steps to making money with a sales blog. When you plan your blog for sales from the start, your blog will be profitable for you from the start.

David Ogilvy’s Classic Work: How to Create Advertising That Sells Review Part 3

How to Create Advertising that Sells Review Part 3

Almost Home…

David Ogilvy’s classic How to Create Advertising That Sells Review Part 3 looks at rules eighteen through twenty-seven. It starts with the maxims about TV ads and moving to the maxims of ads in print. The advertising medium isn’t necessarily what’s important here. These maxims pay big and offer a proven history. Get the most out of each advertising dollar. Apply these maxims, regardless of the chosen medium.

Rule 18: Music

Even though, according to Ogilvy, most won’t believe this, music behind the ad in commercials decreases the consumer’s ability to remember ads. Not good, right?

Rule 19: Standups

Stand-up Pitches work if “delivered” with honesty says Ogilvy.

Rule 20: Sore Thumb

The average viewer watches more than 20,000 commercials in a year. Desperate times call for desperate measures! Ogilvy says brand it and make it one of a kind. A symbol (like imperial’s crown) or even a mnemonic device can be used.

Rule 21: Animate?

Cartoons really sell to children. Children don’t hold the power of the pocketbook however. It’s critical to know the audience. Cartoons and animation doesn’t turn over to customers when adults are the target. Grown-ups can’t “identify” with animation. This makes it less persuasive.

Rule 22: Save it!

Find out WHY an ad didn’t work. Then, repair it. Once fixed, it’s ready to go to work for real!

Rule 23: Factual vs. Emotional

In the big scheme of things, commercials which offer facts about the product or service will rank as more effective than ones using emotions. Ogilvy’s example was Maxwell House Coffee. It was very emotional and a huge success. It goes both ways, but stats say go with the facts.

Rule 24: Attention Grabbers

Commercials which open with a fast, grab the attention of viewers, and tend to hold their attention significantly better to the end than the quiet-start commercials.

What Works Best in Print…

As part of this How to Create Advertising that Sells Review Part 2, we’ll move to print advertising. We’ll look at what works and what does not.

Rule 25: 80/20

What’s 80/20? Sadly, only twenty percent of viewers will go past headlines in order to reach the content. Since eighty percent DO read the headlines, the sale takes place in the headline! There’s a conversion rate which is 5 times greater than not creating a dynamic headline. Ogilvy always used his company name and gave promise in the headline.

Rule 26: Benefits

Headlines giving a solid benefit get more sales over those that do not. Human nature makes anyone want to find out what’s in it for them! This is one of the strongest maxims in this How to Create Advertising that Sells Review Part 3 to be found.

Rule 27: News

People are curious about new products or service. They want to know which products have been changed or improved, giving reason to read on. The stats say headlines that tell sell.

Review in Summary

That completes this next part of David Ogilvy’s How to Create Advertising that Sells Review, part 3 of 4. Television and print are obviously very different advertising mediums. However, there is much to learn and apply from both arenas… Remember: Say ‘No’ to background music. Stand-ups work. Stand above the crowd. Fix whatever isn’t converting and try it again. Facts sell more than emotion. Grab the viewer’s attention right out the door. Power is in the headline… don’t mess it up! Show the consumer “what is in it for them”… give the biggest, strongest benefit inside the headline. Finally, share newsy points about what’s being sold will work extremely well.

Part four of How to Create Advertising that Sells Review will conclude more million-dollar truths by Ogilvy and show what works and what doesn’t. If viewer’s attention isn’t grabbed or demanded, the sale is lost! Part 4 promises to end with a bang, so keep looking.

Soft Selling To Boost Your Affiliate Commissions

If your are an affiliate wanting to promote products online, and did not consider the art of soft selling to boost your affiliate commissions, you are probably behaving like the sales man who knocks on people’s doors only to get them slammed shut more often than not and because people do not like being sold to, they would naturally back away from you.

In online terms, there is nothing worst than not knowing the best course of action when it comes to promoting products and services. What do you think it’s going to happen when you blast emails to every person on your lists or put links around the forums? Let alone spam article directories with sales pitches for unrelated programs and services?

On the other hand, when your prospects are actually interested in buying something and they seek and get a second opinion from another customer or friend, who have already bought the product or know about it, they would more readily want to buy from you in this case than when you were simply acting as a hard sales person.

The fact is that people buy into people and this principle is real also on the web. So when someone gives an opinion about somebody else and his services or products, the results is much more powerful than selling face to face. This form of referral is what is known as soft selling and it can be achieved mostly through reviews of products and services or from word of mouth of course.

If you write reviews about services or products that you have or know about and post these articles all over the web, provided they contain the most targeted keywords possible, the search engines will pick them up and index them high in the rankings. Clearly then, these reviews will give your products a lot of exposure to create traffic to your sites and thus boost your commissions.

This is not going to work very well for highly targeted very competitive words where the big companies are already spending huge amounts of cash on back links to stay at the top of the rankings but if you go after the long tail keywords that target derivatives of the main expensive keywords or subsets of the niches you are in, followed by “review”, you can go to the top of the rankings as well to give you the chance of picking more commissions.

Soft selling a product then can be done very well by recommending it, after you have used it yourself, know about it through comments on forums or by studying the benefits given in its sales letter. In other words, you are doing a review of it and highlighting what the product can do for your customers as well.

In the soft selling reviews that you make, you will include the links to the merchant’s product, in addition to what you discovered about the product and how its benefits far out weight any minor faults that you find. That is why you recommend it, since it worked for you and you know it will work for everyone else. Oh, and use at least twice the link to the merchant in your article review.

Tell your audience how their success online will reflect how well they can position themselves against their competition and how the services and products that you recommend will help them achieve that status. When you demonstrate what the products that you soft sell to your customers can do for them, they are bound to take action to try them out.

Remember that these articles reviews type of soft selling can be sent to the social networks. Yes use the main ones at least; just Google the top 10 and shoot them these review-articles type of soft selling recommendations. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at the amount of targeted traffic that this tactic generated for you, making you lots of sales for your online business.

Use the article directories as well. Again, find out the top 10 and post these review-articles that at least include in your bio your affiliate links for the products that you promote. There may be some directories that may not allow you to do that so it is best to look at their terms and conditions first.

If you also send shortened reviews of products in your auto responder, this alone can multiply your sales as your own customers will trust your recommendations for the products they are after.

You actually can make money out of the article-review type of recommendations you create. When you have a good number of them, you could set up a review site and sell them in group form or individually. There is a lot of potential for these reviews when you packaged them in a themed review type site.

Think about the millions of searches going through Google at any time with people thinking about getting products and not knowing if they are good for them. See? Many of them need a final push to make that decision to buy and you can provide them the answer with your social proof and action taken recommendations to buy.

German Calvo.